The Sugar Masters Planters and Slaves in Louisiana's Cane

[Read] ➫ The Sugar Masters Planters and Slaves in Louisiana's Cane World 1820 1860 By Richard J. Follett – Catalizadores.co Focusing on the master slave relationship in Louisiana's antebellum sugarcane country The Sugar Masters explores how a modern capitalist mind set among planters meshed with old style paternalistic attFocusing on the master slave relationship in Louisiana's antebellum sugarcane country The Sugar Masters explores how a modern capitalist mind set among planters meshed with old style paternalistic attitudes to create one of the South's most insidiously oppressive labor systems As author Richard Follett vividly demonstrates the agricultural paradise of Louisiana's thriving sugarcane fields came at an unconscionable cost to slavesThanks to technological and business innovations sugar planters stood as models of capitalist entrepreneurship by midcentury But above all labor management was the secret to their impressive success Follett explains how in exchange.

For increased productivity and efficiency they offered their slaves a range of incentives such as greater autonomy improved accommodations and even financial remuneration These material gains however were only short termAccording to Follett many of Louisiana's sugar elite presented their incentives with a facade of paternal reciprocity that seemingly bound the slaves' interests to the apparent goodwill of the masters but in fact the owners sought to control every aspect of the slaves's lives from reproduction to discretionary income Slaves responded to this display of paternalism by trying to enhance their rights under bondage but the constant bargaining p.

sugar download masters epub planters pdf slaves mobile louisiana's download cane mobile world pdf 1820 free 1860 epub The Sugar free Masters Planters download Masters Planters and Slaves pdf Sugar Masters Planters download Sugar Masters Planters and Slaves epub The Sugar Masters Planters and Slaves in Louisiana's Cane World 1820 1860 eBookFor increased productivity and efficiency they offered their slaves a range of incentives such as greater autonomy improved accommodations and even financial remuneration These material gains however were only short termAccording to Follett many of Louisiana's sugar elite presented their incentives with a facade of paternal reciprocity that seemingly bound the slaves' interests to the apparent goodwill of the masters but in fact the owners sought to control every aspect of the slaves's lives from reproduction to discretionary income Slaves responded to this display of paternalism by trying to enhance their rights under bondage but the constant bargaining p.

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